Traffic congestion means more trucks, growing economy

  • Traffic congestion means more trucks, growing economy

    Traffic congestion means more trucks, growing economy

    Traffic is as American as apple pie, and as more drivers hit the road each year – including commercial truck drivers – the traffic congestion in the United States is getting worse.

    Traffic congestion in the U.S. had actually decreased over the past two years, but the latest Traffic Scorecard Annual Report from Inrix shows an increase of 4 percent in 2013. However, the silver lining for an increase in traffic congestion is that some believe it indicates an improving economy.

    “This suggests that after a tumultuous economic year in 2012, the economy is back on the mend, bringing increased traffic congestion,” the Inrix report stated.

    Traffic congestion had dropped by 22 percent in 2012 and that it was largely based on a struggling economy. “Fears over recurring fiscal deadlines and ongoing debt issues last year likely fueled declines in traffic congestion, with businesses and consumers alike taking a ‘wait and see’ approach,” said Bryan Mistele, Inrix president and chief executive officer. “While bad news for drivers, the gains we’ve seen in the U.S. and a few countries in Europe in 2013 are cause for some optimism about the direction of the economy.”

    Mistele said that in 2013, traffic congestion in the U.S. increased each month for the first three months of the year, which is the first such consecutive month increase in two years. The report also found that so far this year, 61 of America’s top 100 most populated cities have experienced increased traffic congestion, a dramatic shift from 2012, where only six cities experienced increases and 94 saw decreases.

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